INFLUENCE OF NITROGEN AND PLANT SPACING ON THE YIELD OF BORO RICE

M. A. Uddin, M.H. Ali, P.K. Biswas, S.M. Masum* and M. S. H. Mandal
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*Corresponding author E-mail: smmasum607@yahoo.com

Abstract
An experiment was conducted at Agricultural farm of Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka, during December 2007 to May 2008, in Boro season to study the influence of nitrogen and plant spacing on yield of boro (winter) riceThere were three doses of nitrogen (150, 200 and 250 kg ha-1and four plant spacing’s (25cm × 10cm, 25cm × 15cm and 25cm × 20cm and 25 cm × 25 cm)Results revealed that panicle length, 1000-grain weight, grain yield and harvest index were not responsive to higher rate of nitrogen application and maximum plant spacing. But with the application of 200 kg N ha-1 with plant spacing of 25cm×15cm gave the highest grain yield (7.58 t ha-1), 1000-grain weight (26.21g) and harvest index (45.57%).


Key words: Boro rice, nitrogen, plant spacing, yield, BRRI dhan29


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VIRUSES INFECTING WEEDS ACT AS ALTERNATE HOST

Author(s): M. R. Ara*, M. M. H. Masud and A. M. Akanda

*Corresponding author; Email: bithi.treno@gmail.com

Abstract

A study was conducted to identify if viruses infecting weeds act as alternate host. In all five different viruses namely TPVV(Tomato Purple Vein Virus), CMV-Y (Cucumber Mosaic Virus-Y ), OYVCMV (Okra Yellow Vein clearing Mosaic Virus), MYMV (Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus), TYLCV (Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus) were identified as the  causal virus/possible causal viruses from  virus disease like symptoms developed under natural condition on six weed species Blumea laceracera (Kremahan), Salamum torvum (Soushumber), Jussiaea suffruticosa (Wing Water Primrose),  Physalis heterophylla (Ground cherry),  Ageratum conyzoides (Goat weed), Synedrella nodiflora (Babadoton lalaki) growing at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU), Salna, Gazipur, campus. The viruses were identified on the basis of symptomatological study and inoculation test.  It was observed that MYMV caused Yellow Mosaic of Blumea laceracera, while TYLCV caused leaf distortion mosaic of Solarium tarvum, mosaic of Physalis heterophylla, yellow mosaic of Synedrella nodiflora, mosaic of Ageratun conyzoides. OYVCMV was diagnosed as the causal agent of vein chlorosis of Synedrella nodiflora . It was found that TPVV caused yellow vein mosaic of Jussiaea suffruticosa. All the viruses so far identified were member of Gminivirus group except CMV-Y, which belong to Comovirus group.


Keywords: Virus, weed, Alternate host.

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USE OF ORGANIC FERTILIZER TO REDUCE THE AMOUNT OF CHEMICAL FERTILIZERS IN MUSTARD


Author(s): R. Jerin, A. K. M. R. Amin, P. K. Biswas, M. Hasanuzzaman* and A. S. M. Fazle Bari 
*Corresponding author; Email: sauhasan@gmail.com


Abstract

The experiment was conducted at Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University farm, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka during rabi season (October 2010 to March 2011) to study the feasibility of replacing chemical fertilizer by organic fertilizer in mustard. The  experiment comprised of ten treatments viz., T0 (without fertilizer, control), T1 (Chemical fertilizer at recommended dose, RD), T2 (Cowdung at RD), T3 (Compost at RD), T4 (½ RD Cowdung + ½ RD Compost), T5 (Cowdung at RD+ compost at RD), T6 (Cowdung RD + ½ RD Chemical fertilizer), T7 (Compost RD + ½ RD Chemical fertilizer), T8 (Cowdung RD + Compost  RD + ½ RD Chemical fertilizer) and  T9 (½ RD Cowdung + ½ RD compost + ½ RD chemical fertilizer) on growth and yield performance of mustard var. BARI Sarisha15. Among the treatments, all the chemical fertilizer treatments at recommended dose (T1); recommended doses of cowdung and compost in combination with half RD chemical fertilizer (T8) and half RD cowdung and half RD compost with half RD chemical fertilizer (T9) were at par and superior to other treatments considering the yield and yield contributing characters of mustard.


Key word: Organic and inorganic fertilizer and mustard.

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STUDY ON HETEROSIS AND INBREEDING DEPRESSION OF SOME YIELD CONTRIBUTING CHARACTERS IN LENTIL

Author (S): U. Sarker*, M. R. Karim, M. M. Rashid, and A. C. Deb
*Corresponding author; E-mail: upama.sarker@yahoo.com

Abstract

The present investigation deals with studies of heterosis and inbreeding depression. Six irradiated lentil line considered as material for this investigation. Seeds were shown in rows of the plots of the field. After attaining all lines to flower hybridization was brought out to produce F1 seeds. Emasculation and artificial pollination were performed for carrying out hybridization. After artificial pollination, pods with labels were collected when those were fully ripe. Seeds of all crosses of lentil were shown randomly in rows of replication to produce F2 seed. Data of six quantitative characters were collected on individual plant basis. Data were measured and recorded on the following characters, Date of first flower (DFF), Plant height at first flower (PHFF), Number of primary branches at first flower (NPBFF), Number of secondary branches at first flower (NSBFF), Plant area per plant (PAPP) and Number of secondary branches at maximum flower (NSBMF). In this analysis heterosis and inbreeding depression were found to be non-significant for all the characters and also they were observed as positive and negative. Both are useful in crop improvement. Depending upon the breeding objectives, in general positive heterosis is desired for yield and negative heterosis is for earliness.


Key words: Lentil, Hybridization pollination, Heterosis and Inbreeding depression

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GENETIC DIVERSITY AMONG YELLOW GRAIN MAIZE INBRED LINES


Author (S): M. Amiruzzaman*, M. N. Amin, M. Z. A. Talukder, A. Ahmed  and M. R. Ali
*Correspondence author; Email:amiruzzaman95@yahoo.com

Abstract

Twenty five yellow grain maize inbred lines were evaluated at the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Joydebpur during rabi 2009-2010 following alpha lattice design to study the genetic divergence using Mahalanobis’s D2 and Rao’s canonical variate analysis for eleven parameters. The twenty five inbreds formed five distinct clusters. The intra-cluster distance was more or less low, indicating that the genotypes within the same clusters were closely related. The highest inter-cluster distance was observed between cluster I and V and the lowest between cluster II and III. The cluster III and V each contained the highest number of genotypes. Cluster V showed the highest mean values for kernel yield and all the yield contributing traits except days to pollen shedding, silking and 1000-kernel weight. Cluster I had the lowest mean values for plant and ear height and maturity traits. Days to silking, ear length, number of kernels row-1, 1000-kernel weight and kernel yield showed maximum contribution towards total divergence among different characters. Based on medium to high inter-cluster distance, per se performances and desirable traits, fourteen yellow inbred lines viz. BIL 77, BIL 97, CML 287, CML 470, CML 480, CML 486, CZ 2370-22-2, CZ 2370-24-3, CZ 2370-28-2, CZ 2370-31-3, IPB 911-2, IPB 911-22, IPB 911-36 and IPB 911-50 were selected for future hybridization program. Crossing between these genotypes have the chance to obtain higher heterosis with high performing crosses.


Keywords: Genetic diversity, inbred lines and yellow maize.

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